British Election 2015 Results

It’s been a little under two weeks that the results for the British Election 2015 became clear. I had to give myself a few days to allow the dust to settle, to gather my thoughts and be able to construe them into words. I must admit, since the results I have been feeling deflated and dispirited. I have never concerned myself with polls, and to be honest, I don’t believe polls give a true reflection of the election build up, and certainly the percentage of voters does not correspond to how the system works – first past the post.

Even the exit poll, which suggested Conservative would be able to form a government by full majority, didn’t even seem accurate, and to some extent confirmed my belief that polls were not to be relied on. That said, I certainly didn’t expect them to be so damn completely wrong.

To the run up of the election my thoughts played through a couple of scary scenarios. The worst outcome I dreaded was for the Conservatives to return with enough seats to form a government with full majority. At the time, this seemed impossible.

The second scariest scenario was a re-run of events from 2010. A LibDem coalition yet again with the Conservatives would be an unpleasant outcome but one I could agree to be the worst case outcome, after all, we had seem them run this country for the last 5 years so we could, as I said in the worst case scenario, live with it for another five years.

Despite the polls agreeing with my thoughts, the worst outcome never really played on my mind until Friday the 8th of May, and boy oh boy, did it shock me or what.

Confirmation that Conservatives are predicted to be able to form a government absolute immediately rattled me, let alone the entire election debate. Immediately it became clear, Mr Cameron, had indeed, played the fears of those voters who were undecided and held back from voting Labour purely on the basis that Labour is totally depended on the SNP. Despite Labour’s clear stance on this and this not to be the case, much of these, undecided voters, were forced to vote for Conservatives.

It has now started to sink in.

Another five years of an absolute Conservative government is a scary thought. We will, of course, have another chance of getting rid of the Tories in five years, but with the likely departure of Scotland, a worrying referendum on our European Membership, and with the changes in boundary, it’s actually quite hard to see how that’s going to happen.

When someone asked me ‘what the result and absolute Conservative government means?’ I couldn’t help tweet the following, which I believe, sums up my feelings towards this government.

Labour did badly in England and Scotland. The SNP wiped the floor with Labour, and although many political analysts didn’t want to admit this is likely to happen pre-election, it was probably the price Labour had to pay for siding with LibDem/Conservatives in aligning themselves with the No campaign. It’s hard to accept what Labour could have done different to prevent this outcome.

In my view Labour under Ed Miliband was too left wing, thus abandoning centre voters (who otherwise would have voted for Labour) leaving them undecided. It was these undecided voters who then scrambled to either give their vote to UKIP, Green Party or Conservatives. The challenge now for Labour, in amongst the turmoil of selecting a new Leader, which in my view needs to be done sooner rather than later (September), is to bring them back to the centre.

Now that the 2015 general election is over, it is time, indeed to move on. I do, however, feel nervous in what five more years of absolute Conservative government will bring. I really do hope Labour can bring forward a new leader, who understands the mistakes of the past, and can bring about a real change, more importantly, who can really stand up to the Conservatives and challenge them on their governing policies.

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