The British Asian Blog

Life as it is @tbablog

Tag: technology

Letter to my, then, teenage self

Letter to my younger self

Dude:

I’m writing to you using my Samsung Galaxy S3 smart phone.  Never you mind.

You’re 14 and you’re going to rock (later) in life.  So far it’s been notoriously dazzling.

Regards

The future You – Age 20-something.

P.S.  July and August of 2013 will be a key milestone and a turning point in your life in so far as finance and wealth is concerned, its make or break time.  Oh, and the crazy, eyebrow raising and funny experiments you’re going to do with food, when you return for 2nd term at Berkshire in Sept, will later on in life make you a guy who can cook impressively – the creativity and no-short-of-magic will work with them each time.

 

Advertisements

Achievement Award for 2012

The desire to succeed in life has always been the fire or flame inside me.  No matter what it is, how trivial it is – I have the desire to succeed.  Those who know me spend their time around me and who generally come in and out of my environment will be all too familiar with this flame – it’s always burning.

This morning when I arrived into office we had our regular communications meeting – scheduled once every month for all managerial positions to attend to learn about developments, progress, issues, solutions and regular updates – I was presented with an ‘Achievement Award’ for 2012.  It came as a total shock and surprise to me when the chair of the meeting and regional director announced my name, in front of approximately 30 other managers seated and another 10 or 20 who attended via video conference, called me up and handed me the award certificate.

The wording on the certificate said “Achievement Award – awarded for dedication and perseverance resulting in 100% successful project/assignment delivery this calendar year”, and with this came a high street voucher for £250.  During the meeting one more person was given an achievement award.

Since then, it’s dawned upon me that although I was engulfed and indulged in the daily grind of ensuring those projects under my management were on track to be delivered and where I fought endlessly to ensure the projects didn’t derail – it took someone else to recognise my hard work, dedication and desire to succeed, and it felt good and valued.

During 2012, I successfully delivered 3 projects which ran parallel to one another, and delivered 4 major milestones with our ongoing main healthcare contract – total value of these projects for 2012 hits approximately £4.7 million.  My previous best in 2010 was £4.2 million.

Although this certificate indicates that I exceed expectation of my targets that were set, my annual performance review is already looking promising.  What helped my confidence was the regional manager who later approached me at my office and congratulate me in person hinted to ensure I get prepared for my annual appraisal which to me indicates towards two things pay increase and promotion to the next tier above, something which my manager hinted in November last year.

I’m in my office, with this certificate on my desk and I’m wondering whether I could do this again – whether I could beat my 2012 best efforts of delivering projects beyond £4.7 million worth?

All I can say is this – I have the desire to succeed.

What the British do in a crisis?

Due to my long vacation and business trip to South Asia this December (and to rub it in – it’s spanning almost for the entire month minus a few days) I need to do a handover of my projects to other Project Managers, more about this trip in another post.

As part of the first handover meeting between me and 6 other senior Project/Program Managers this morning, we discussed my strategy in dealing with customers, healthcare professional, suppliers, issues and risk factors and how to avert a crisis or how to deal with one.

Now many Project/Program Managers have their own way of dealing with a crisis (when the sugar hits the fan).  Some run around screaming, some try pinning the blame on others, some walk off quietly and find a quiet corner and scream, some simply ask others (like me) for help.  I have a different way in dealing with a crisis.

What do I do in a crisis is drink more tea.

That’s right – the British (including British Asian) way of dealing with a crisis is to drink more tea, simple.

When I explained this to an American Project Manager, he looked up to the left, scratched his head and replied “I don’t drink tea”.  To which my response was “Yes I know.  You’re not British”.  The British and British Asians have always drunk tea, plenty of it, during a crisis.

The British Asian Blog – Tea

Just saying.

%d bloggers like this: